login   |    register
Painting: Painting with Acrylic
Discuss Acrylic painting techniques.
Hosted by Gino Poppe
Painting large-scale bust -skin color
spongya
Staff MemberAssociate Editor
MODELGEEK
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Budapest, Hungary
Joined: February 01, 2005
KitMaker: 2,275 posts
Historicus Forma: 46 posts
Posted: Monday, February 11, 2019 - 01:55 AM UTC
Dear All,

Being an armor modeller, I am facing a crisis here. I bought the Angron bust by Artel W Miniatures, and I would need to somehow paint his head in skin tones.

Which I have no experience in. I do have a range of citadel flesh colored paints, and generic artist oils.

I would like to ask you if these were sufficient enough to get a proper result, since I would like to solve this issue without spending more on paints.

What techniques should I be using with these paints? How to use oils when painting large-scale faces?

I do not expect anyone to write essays; just some pointers, links would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you for your help.
JPTRR
Staff MemberManaging Editor
RAILROAD MODELING
#051
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Tennessee, United States
Joined: December 21, 2002
KitMaker: 7,402 posts
Historicus Forma: 163 posts
Posted: Tuesday, March 05, 2019 - 11:05 AM UTC
Hi Andras,

Back in the 70s IIRC Shep Paine commented that most commercial flesh tones were too pink or yellow. (Anyone remember the Pactra color of the 1970s?? Ugh!) Paine wrote that since soldiers spend a lot of time outside, they can plausibly be expected to be tanned or reddened by sun.

I began mixing my own with tan and orange. Add a tint of white, or white and red, to suite. I used to brush my mix onto my hand to check for authenticity. I used such for these figures:

[/url]

Instead of Pactra or Testors or Tamiya, those skin tones were mixed with artist oils of sienna and white, with some umber and ochre added.

If you find some Testors kits from the 70s and 80s, look at their instruction sheets. They would present a tutorial on painting faces with their tans, browns, rusts and rubber colors.

JUst be very careful adding black. It is a powerful color that will quickly change the hue you add it to, usually permanently muddying it a gray tone.

BTW, FWIW, Paine wrote that he rarely used more than 5-6 colors - he mixed all his paints by eye.
JPTRR
Staff MemberManaging Editor
RAILROAD MODELING
#051
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Tennessee, United States
Joined: December 21, 2002
KitMaker: 7,402 posts
Historicus Forma: 163 posts
Posted: Tuesday, March 05, 2019 - 11:15 AM UTC
The nice thing about oils on large faces/bodies is that once you get your base tone down, you can use smaller brushes to add the highlights/shadows/ruddy tones where you need them, and then larger brushes to blend them.

For instance, face color. Then subtle shade under the cheeks, lower lip, below nose. Add a small dab of reddish atop check bone. Then take a broader brush and gently brush both across the colors horizontally and vertically to blend. Then a dot of two of a highlight, and brush it outward where you want it.

Beard? Try to use gray sparingly but also add a dark green or red. Practice first but it will make the skin tone look more fleshy.
Kevlar06
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Washington, United States
Joined: March 15, 2009
KitMaker: 2,775 posts
Historicus Forma: 22 posts
Posted: Tuesday, March 05, 2019 - 03:58 PM UTC
Fred has some good input above about skin tone. I use a very simple system when painting skin in any scale. I lay down a base coat of flesh (properly toned as Fred indicates) in enamel or lacquer. Then I use various shades of oils to bring out the detail. If I want the oils to dry faster, I mix mineral spirits in with them, or I give a light coat of airbrushed Dullcoat to speed the drying between shades. The idea is to "layer" the various shades found in flesh, dark to light.
VR, Russ
JPTRR
Staff MemberManaging Editor
RAILROAD MODELING
#051
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Tennessee, United States
Joined: December 21, 2002
KitMaker: 7,402 posts
Historicus Forma: 163 posts
Posted: Thursday, March 07, 2019 - 02:49 PM UTC
Hi again,

Here's a good tutorial that can be used with big busts.

painting faces from dark to light
http://www.armorama.com/modules.php?op=modload&name=SquawkBox&file=index&req=viewtopic&topic_id=255237#2165111