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Dioramas & Vignettes
Discuss groundwork, vignettes, bases, and the creation of situation or scene.
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history of caution stripes
southpier
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Alberta, Canada
Joined: December 11, 2009
KitMaker: 121 posts
Historicus Forma: 6 posts
Posted: Thursday, January 10, 2019 - 08:53 AM UTC
anyone know when the classic yellow & black combination use started? how was it determined to be a good design? outlier of "dazzle" painted ships? thanks
Kevlar06
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Washington, United States
Joined: March 15, 2009
KitMaker: 2,499 posts
Historicus Forma: 19 posts
Posted: Thursday, January 10, 2019 - 01:20 PM UTC

Quoted Text

anyone know when the classic yellow & black combination use started? how was it determined to be a good design? outlier of "dazzle" painted ships? thanks




Railroads I believe. I think it was a standardized rule in USRA (US Railway Administration) for equipment marking. I know during the 1930s, the yellow and black combination was commonly found on many electric and diesel powered switch locomotives operating in train manifest marshaling yards--the idea was they gave the brakemen and switch-men something to see in the dark against otherwise dark colored locomotive and train equipment. I'm not 100% positive, but I think that's where black and yellow striping started. It was also supplemented by black and silver or black and white designs. It was also common on streetcars and subway trains around the same time, and perhaps even earlier. It would be found down low on the rock/snow defectors (commonly known as "cow catchers") and abutting platforms. The idea was to keep folks from getting their feet under the cars or between cars.
VR, Russ
southpier
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Alberta, Canada
Joined: December 11, 2009
KitMaker: 121 posts
Historicus Forma: 6 posts
Posted: Thursday, January 10, 2019 - 03:18 PM UTC
thanks. i'm modeling in the late '40s, so that date you provided has me covered.
Kevlar06
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Washington, United States
Joined: March 15, 2009
KitMaker: 2,499 posts
Historicus Forma: 19 posts
Posted: Thursday, January 10, 2019 - 03:28 PM UTC
I guess the question is what and where are you modeling? The reason I ask is because if you are modeling something outside N. America, the dates may not be applicable-- I don't know if it was widely regulated in Europe or not. And if you are not modeling something RR related, all bets are off-- as other industries may (or may not) have been regulated to the degree RRs were. For instance-- the trucking industry or the military transport could have used warning stripes differently at different times without any uniformity or regulation.
VR, Russ
southpier
_VISITCOMMUNITY
Alberta, Canada
Joined: December 11, 2009
KitMaker: 121 posts
Historicus Forma: 6 posts
Posted: Thursday, January 10, 2019 - 09:51 PM UTC
in all honesty, I am modeling my "happy place". years ago, maybe late sixties, I read an article about freelance modeling in Model Railroader Magazine about "plausibility". the take-away thought for me was 'if it looks right, it is right'.

the curse of this, is that the more I learn, the more effort needs to be put into getting things to be believable, but that is a cross to bear.


I admire builders that can use bare metal foil, lace every deadeye with period authentic knots, and have synchronized sound emitting from their locomotives. but if I wait to develop the skills for all that before I get to building, I will just add to the collection of incomplete projects on my closet shelf.


at 66, I need get gluing!